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Monday, September 29, 2008

Diversity

A Bosnian guy, employed in Croatia, has recently become famous, with his name all over the headlines. This ordinary guy, working in an uninteresting job, became a top subject of many leading journalists’ columns in Croatia and Bosnia.

By chance this same guy had found a sum of 200,000 Euros next to a parked car he was passing by. There was no name attached to the fat envelope he’d discovered, nothing.

He tried to remember and he figured out that he actually recalled a person coming out of the same car beside which the envelope was lying on the ground, as he'd discovered a bit later. The person wearing a nice suit was the one he’d seen walking away.

Upon finding the envelope, the guy with the shitty job decided to wait there. The man with a suit was gone; he was alone on the parking lot, holding in his hand more money than he ever dared to even imagine. He waited for more than an hour. After a while he saw the guy with the suit, pale as cocoa powder, coming back.

He returned the money and refused accepting any kind of a reward.


Sadly, recently I’ve seen another example of human diversity, [where the outcome might not have been] as fortunate as the aforementioned one. Some of the people involved in the next story are my cousins, unfortunately.

My grandmother used to have a maid. The maid stayed with her for a long time, almost until the very end. The maid’s name was R. She did not have any relatives or family members around, her only brother died a long time before. She knew about only one more cousin that she had left, a woman who was her distant relative and about whose whereabouts R. didn’t know anything. However, all the same R.’s lost cousin will prove to be the most important person in this story.

After the grandmother’s death R. was forced to find a place to stay. The municipal authorities decided to temporarily solve the problem by issuing her a flat reserved for special cases. It was a miraculous turn of events considering that it was wartime in Bosnia. The grandmother was gone, the house where they lived was damaged heavily, and R. was thankful that she had a place to stay. Therefore, she moved to her new apartment, a decant place with one room, kitchen and bathroom, located on the first floor of a high building. The municipal authorities really showed themselves as human and compassionate in this case.

After the war had ended R. was entitled to keep the apartment, as a social case person. And she lived there for years, until recently, when she’d got terribly sick. She ended up in a hospital, at the ripe old age of seventy. She was so weak that the doctors had started making discrete indications about the inevitable.

Upon hearing about R.’s condition, my cousins, my uncle’s wife and her daughter decided to try out their luck, in this unique opportunity that had opened up for them. They started visiting R. in the hospital, bringing her fruits, juices and nice, clean sheets. They did everything in their power to show a heartbreaking care for a lady who was about to leave this world. As R.’s condition worsened, their care for her increased proportionally.

They had managed to get R. to sign a piece of paper; the paper said that after R.’s death the new owners of her apartment would be the mother and the daughter who were standing beside her hospital bed, her angels from nowhere.

After she signed it, the mother and the daughter stopped their visits.

They did not bring any more fruit or nice sheets, or themselves.

Poor R. was confused and lost, unable to get up from the bed anymore.

However, then, when everybody had already given up on her, her miraculous recovery started.

Bit by bit her condition improved until she was able to finally get up from the bed, and ultimately – to leave the hospital.

The first day she’d gotten out of the hospital, she rushed to the only place she’d gotten left, where else but to her nice flat. But the lock on the doors had been changed, and the poor woman now knew what it was all about.

She'd get out of the building, crying and terribly upset. She knew that she’d signed that paper. It was a terrible moment for her, almost unbearable.

But just as she’d gotten out of the building, standing in the entrance, in tears, suddenly she saw a smiling female person approaching her. A woman with a red hair was waving and smiling. It was her only cousin, the only person she’s got left on this planet. She just arrived from another part of the country, upon hearing somehow, by pure chance, about R.’s illness.

Together they went to the court and explained that R. had been cheated and manipulated during her terrible illness. The mother and the daughter tried to take an advantage of her condition in such a callous way.

The court dismissed the validity of the paper that R. had signed when she had believed that she’d never got up from that bed again.

She had got her flat back, and her red-haired cousin stayed there together with her for a week, as she does every time now when she’s in town.

12 comments:

Bobbysaid...

Wow, I'm glad things worked out for her. It's always nice when something good happens. At a previous job, a customer accidentally left his wallet containing his ID and $700.00. I was unable to locate the man, but kept his wallet in the work safe, hoping he came back.

Seven months later, the man walked in and had no idea he had left it there, he thought he'd lost it somewhere else. I shocked him by giving him his wallet with all the money in it. He couldn't believe it and was so happy to get it back. I felt good that I was honest and nothing beats that feeling!

Jena Islesaid...

These stories are incredibly so humane. Stories such as these ones happen in all parts of the world. We hear of honest persons who do good deeds and the other type of person taking shameless advantage of one's misery.

I met these two type of persons during the Mt. Pinatubo eruption, here in our own locality. There we were, I and my children soaked to the bone with rain and we could not cross the river because of the raging "lahar" from the volcano.

The tricycle driver took advantage of our miserable situation by charging us enormous fees for bringing us back to town. I could not understand how he could do that in the face of the danger in which we were in. My spirit was down then.

Back in town, we went looking for a place to stay; some room to rent so that my children could rest their weary head. There were no hotels as it was a very small village. We became hopeless when a man, passed by and saw us. He learned of our predicament and offered his house for us to stay in. I had to concede as the children were shivering and exhausted. His whole family welcomed us, and this restored my faith in people.

They never asked any payment from us, we stayed there with food and shelter provided and they even sent us off the following morning. I could never forget the De la Cruz family during that fateful 1992 disaster.

I remembered this after reading your touching post. I think I'll write about this too eventually in my blog.

Thanks for sharing your two contrasting and interesting stories.

Happy blogging.

J. C.said...

Hi Bobz, the great Argentinian writer Borges said once that dishonesty or unfairness in this world can hurt similarly to a physical pain. I had not doubts about you, and it is a great thing that you did by returning that guy;s wallet.

Hi Jena, you should definitely write about your incredible experience, it's so interesting. Thanks for a great comment.

Sandradbsaid...

It's always nice to hear some of those stories that have happy ending - unfortunately, most of the time we are faced with "not so happy" end leaving people in awful situations without hope or legal help. Luckily, humanity isn't dead yet.
P.S. J.C. hvala na komentaru na "naškom" blogu :-) - pozdrav iz HR. Ti si u Sarajevu ili ...?

J. C.said...

Hi Sandra, thanks for the comment. Probably we all have a bunch of the similar stories to tell.

P.S. I am closer than you think - in Bihac, less than a 2 hours drive from ZG. Cheers.

Emmsaid...

What amazing stories! Thanks for sharing.

Sandrasaid...

Great to hear from you - pozdrav Bihaću iz okolice ZG-a :-)

J. C.said...

Hi Emm, thanks, your blog is great as well.

Michelle Gartnersaid...

I liked the story about the cousin very much, I have a cousin who does a lot for me and it's a great comfort because I don't have any brothers and sisters.

J. C.said...

Hi Michelle I am glad you liked the story, nice to see you around.

Sam Freedoms Internet Marketing Controversy Blogsaid...

And the moral to the story is.... don't feed nutritious oranges to people you want to die?

J. C.said...

It is an interesting way to put it Sam.

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